Health

Fitness trackers accurately measure heart rate but not calories burned

“For a lay user, in a non-medical setting, we want to keep that error under 10 percent,” Shcherbina said. Sixty volunteers, including 31 women and 29 men, wore the seven devices while walking or running on treadmills or using stationary bicycles. Each volunteer’s heart was measured with a medical-grade electrocardiograph. Metabolic rate was estimated with an instrument for measuring the oxygen and ...

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Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life

Whether it’s caffeinated or decaffeinated, coffee is associated with lower mortality, which suggests the association is not tied to caffeine By Zen Vuong Here’s another reason to start the day with a cup of joe: Scientists have found that people who drink coffee appear to live longer. Drinking coffee was associated with a lower risk of death due to heart disease, ...

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How blood vessels slow down and accelerate tumor growth

Cancer cells have an enormous need for oxygen and nutrients. Therefore, growing tumors rely on the simultaneous growth of capillaries, the fine branching blood vessels that form a supply network for them. The formation of new blood vessels, called angiogenesis, is therefore a possible target for cancer therapy. Physicians use special inhibitors called angiogenesis inhibitors to “starve” tumors. However, these ...

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Study finds long-term sustained effect of biological psoriasis treatment

Biological treatment of psoriasis shows a good efficacy in clinical trials. Since most analyses have focused on short-term outcomes of single biological agents, little has been known about long-term outcomes in clinical practice, where switching between biological agents is common. A Swedish study that followed 583 individuals for up to 10 years shows a satisfactory long-term effectiveness of biologic treatments. ...

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Republican Part-Time Nation: Going Involuntary

One of the lines the Republicans often used to attack Obamacare was complaining that it would lead to a massive switch to part-time work. The argument was that employers would cut all their workers to less than 30 hours a week. This would exempt them from the employer mandates in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The line “part-time nation” was ...

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Protecting Medicaid's Promise

With the start of the new Congress and new Administration, health care policy is on the front burner in Washington. The future is very uncertain, and the stakes are high. Health care touches all of us and affects nearly 20% of the U.S. economy. AARP is very focused on making sure any health care reforms protect older Americans and their ...

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Free at Last: HIV, Parenthood and Caregiving

I’m not a parent. I have three nephews, however, and I’m happy having the role of uncle. I wasn’t always satisfied with being childless. In fact, one of my early struggles with having HIV was mourning the loss of potential parenthood. Fortunately, when it comes to being a mother or a father, things are much different now for people living ...

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Protecting Medicaid's Promise

With the start of the new Congress and new Administration, health care policy is on the front burner in Washington. The future is very uncertain, and the stakes are high. Health care touches all of us and affects nearly 20% of the U.S. economy. AARP is very focused on making sure any health care reforms protect older Americans and their ...

Read More »

Side Effects Not a Major Problem for New Class of Breast Cancer Drugs

A ground-breaking new class of oral drugs for treating breast cancer, known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, are generally well-tolerated, with a manageable toxicity profile for most patients. This is the conclusion of a comprehensive review of toxicities and drug interactions related to this class of drugs, recently published in The Oncologist. The excitement surrounding CDK inhibitors is due to their ...

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